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China’s Car Market (GOODNEWS/BADNEWS) October 22, 2009

Posted by frewon9 in News.
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Chinese auto output hits 10 million mark

China’s annual auto production has exceeded 10 million units for the first time, as the country’s car makers boost output to meet the growing demand. The record was broken after the 10-millionth car rolled off the First Auto Works Group’s assembly line in Changchun, Jilin Province. The group estimates that output is likely to hit 12 million units for all of 2009.

Despite the global financial crisis, and falling sales from global car makers, China overtook the US as the world’s largest auto market this January. The increases come on the heels of government’s stimulus measures, that encourage sales of low-emission vehicles. Major car producers, including Volkswagon and GM, are now targeting China as their key market.

The 10 millionth vehicle -- a new Jiefang (Liberation) truck model -- rolls off the assembly line in FAW, China's oldest automotive group, making China the third country in the world to surpass the annual output mark on Oct 20, 2009. [Asianewsphoto]

ON THE OTHER SIDE OF THE NEWS

Traffic, nightmare for commuters

http://english.cctv.com/program/chinatoday/20091021/101892.shtml


In Beijing, there are nearly 4 million cars, and that number is growing by the minute. In the last week of August, the traffic control department recorded more than 10-thousand new vehicles.
The fast expansion of the auto sector may be good news for car makers, but not so good for drivers. In Beijing, there are nearly 4 million cars, and that number is growing by the minute. In the last week of August, the traffic control department recorded more than 10-thousand new vehicles.

As a result, congestion is becoming a routine part of daily life, creating pressure for drivers and passengers alike and sometimes even leading to incidents of road rage. CCTV reporter takes us to Beijing’s famous Ring Roads to tell us more about the situation.

It’s nearly 10 in the morning. Cars on the East Third Ring Road are moving slowly, and some of them are simply not moving at all.

The city’s traffic watchdog says during the rush hour, the average car speed on some major roads has plummeted to less than 7 kilometers per hour, making Beijing the slowest city in China.


A commuter in Beijing said, “It’s impossible to squeeze onto buses or drive home during the rush hour. The only choice is the subway.”
In an attempt to ease traffic congestion, the city has adopted a new policy, restricting the number of cars depending on their license numbers.

But it doesn’t really work so well.

A taxi driver in Beijing said, “The restriction didn’t help at all. In fact it’s making it worse. People just buy another car and the restriction is useless. So there are more cars now. Traffic jams are now common even on weekends.”

Traffic control experts believe there is a simple solution.

Mao Baohua, Vice President of Metropolitan Transportation Research Center, said, “The key is to persuade people not to drive their private cars and use public transportation instead.”

But, for residents who commute to Beijing’s Central Business District, this is far from an adequate solution.

A commuter in Beijing said, “It’s impossible to squeeze onto buses or drive home during the rush hour. The only choice is the subway.”

After anxious commuters cram into the subway, the next struggle is for a place to stand inside the trains.

“It’s extremely crowded in the train carriage. We’re crammed just like sardines.”


After anxious commuters cram into the subway, the next struggle is for a place to stand inside the trains.
Traffic experts are debating other alternatives, like levying higher parking fees in downtown areas, and cracking down harder on random parking. But before they settle on a solution, the traffic jams are likely to continue for the foreseeable future.

Source: CCTV. com

ARE HUMANS ARE PROGRAM TO CHOKE ON THEM SELF. AS A MEASURE OF CONTROL? or are we too much to the planet we live in ” like this if Fucking too much increases population what will supply the demand of the population? and is it putting infrastructure to the limit

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