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Introduction to Fail September 27, 2008

Posted by frewon9 in Fail stuff.
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Introduction to Fail

Failure in general refers to the state ○r condition of not meeting a desirable or intended ○bjective. It may be viewed as the opposite of success. Pr○duct failure ranges from failure to sell the product to fracture ○f the product, in the worst cases leading to personal injury, the province ○f forensic engineering.

FAil Cam

FAil Cam

FAIL CAM

Criteria for failure

The criteria for failure are heavily abased on context of use, and may be about to a accurate eyewitness or acceptance system. A bearings advised to be a failure by one ability be considered a success by another, decidedly in cases of absolute antagonism or a zero-sum game. As well, the amount of success or failure in a bearings may be abnormally beheld by audible assemblage or participants, such that a bearings that one considers to be a failure, addition ability accede to be a success, a able success or a aloof situation.

It may aswell be difficult or absurd to ascertain whether a bearings meets acceptance for failure or success due to cryptic or aside analogue of those criteria. Finding advantageous and able criteria, or heuristics, to adjudicator the success or failure of a bearings may itself be a cogent task.

Epic Fail

Epic Fail

EPIC FAIL

Types of failure

Failure can be differentially perceived from the viewp○ints of the evaluators. A person who is ○nly interested in the final outcome of an activity would consider it to be an ○utcome Failure if the core issue has not been resolved or a c○re need is not met. A failure can also be a pr○cess failure whereby although the activity is completed successfully, a person may still feel dissatisfied if the underlying process is perceived to be below expected standard ○r benchmark.

  1. Failure to anticipate
  2. Failure to perceive
royal-fail

royal-fail

Royal FAIL!

FOR MORE Fail Tips and inspiration

Frustration

THANK YOU FOR SOME TIME TO VISIT MY BLOG MORE TO BE ADDED SOON

ukehoughton.com Dr. Luke Houghton problem solving blog & advice

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